Who Inspires You?



  • @Rose said in Who Inspires You?:

    The first probably has something to do with the fact that they were written before there were things like TV or radio, certainly Internet. While books remain a form of entertainment now, that seems to be more true back before other forms of keeping oneself amused developed and became mainstream.

    This is true. Good point.

    There's definitely nothing wrong with how much easier it is to get a story out to a wider audience, but yes, you do have to make sure that the story itself is decent before you put it out there, and not everyone feels the need to do that (for whatever reason). The problem comes with being open to correction. There's a fine line between a person feeling like they're being constructively criticized and being downright berated, and with the difficulty of translating tone in writing, it (seems to?) makes people less willing to listen to criticism.

    Tbh I would love watching something that kept the historical Holmes aesthetic in place, just because I like seeing stuff that represents real period views rather than something twisted so that it will at least partially fit modern views (because when was the last time you read a period book in which the protags didn't magically have modern worldviews?), but I agree, it would probably be a turnoff to some people. But then again, everything is a turnoff to someone.



    • The problem comes with being open to correction. There's a fine line between a person feeling like they're being constructively criticized and being downright berated, and with the difficulty of translating tone in writing, it (seems to?) makes people less willing to listen to criticism.*

    True. Part of it comes down to not what people say, necessarily, but how it's said. When I critique, I try to keep the other person's feelings in mind. How would I feel if someone presented me with what I've just typed to someone else? Would it possibly help and give them something to think about, or would it discourage them from revising something and trying something else? I try what I've seen some people call 'the sandwich method'--give someone something you liked, one thing you think needs improvement under that, and then end with something else you liked. It helps keep the critique balanced.

    (because when was the last time you read a period book in which the protags didn't magically have modern worldviews?)

    I try to spring for older copies of works when I can, so they usually include the original language, thoughts, etc, etc of how the author portrayed it. If I can't do that, it's less likely I'll read it. I'm not too interested in the 'sanitized' copies of things because then you're not actually reading what the author intended. But yes, if they had historical!Holmes on TV, I would at least try the first few episodes. :)



  • There are some older Sherlock Holmes movies, from 1939, that stay pretty true to the source material. I'd look them up if you guys want to watch a more true-to-its-time Sherlock. I"ve watched The Hound of the Baskervilles (one of my favorite Sherlock stories btw) and one other that I can't remember the name right now and they were pretty good.


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