Who Inspires You?



  • I haven't, no. But according to that tool, I write like... Stephen King. I'm not sure whether to be amused or horrified.



  • @Rose I love Stephen King.

    I hate him for IT, but I love him. lol

    And you know, I hadn't run any writing through that in a while so I decided to analyze the first chapter of Shadows Rise and it says I write like Agatha Christie. I think I've never been happier with my results. Even though I don't believe them. :P



  • Stephen King for me is very hit or miss. I've read his things on and off since I was...12? Some of his stories really showcase his talent for suspense, whereas others he's even personally admitted were done under a deadline and therefore, not as good. I prefer Poe and a few other authors that may not be as contemporary, but still good.

    Agatha Christie is another one I need to read. I missed out on certain classics in school and reading on my own time when I was younger.



  • @Rose Stephen King is one of those things I love regardless of whether it's good. I think even some of his not-so-great shorts were so utterly bizarre in their premise I found it impossible not to love them for it.

    Agatha Christie is an author I respect a lot, even though she's not always my cup of tea. I believe that crime and mystery novels take a level of mental acuity and attention to detail I may never achieve in my lifetime. ^^'

    Which reminds me I forgot to mention Arthur Conan Doyle in my original post here. I've read A LOT of Sherlock Holmes growing up. A LOT of it.



  • Which reminds me I forgot to mention Arthur Conan Doyle in my original post here. I've read A LOT of Sherlock Holmes growing up. A LOT of it.

    Definitely need to read him too. They have a TV series out based on his works, but to me that's not the same thing. I believe they adapted it to modern audiences. All well and good, but I'd rather read the original first.



  • @Rose There's BBC's Sherlock and then there's Elementary. I like one more than the other, but due to fandom wars exploding in my general vicinity in the past, I won't say which. lol

    Neither show compares to the original works, though. And neither do the movies. They're good, but they're not nearly as good as the source material.



  • I haven't seen the movies or the shows yet. I can imagine that they don't, though. They also have games based on Holmes and Watson. Something else I intend to play when I have a proper system for it, though the new Call of Cthulhu game is due out at the end of this year and that's another thing I want to get my greedy little hands on first.



  • @Rose HP Lovecraft is something I never really got into. And this despite knowing that literally everything and anything horror has drawn at least some inspiration on his work.



  • In the interest of fairness, some of his things can be clunkers like many other authors. His world and mythos were later expanded on by others, and my own interest in it is somewhat more recent since I was commissioned to write characters that were looking into the Elder Gods. I developed a soft spot for the characters themselves and ran with the concepts presented to me (and introduced a few of my own into the mix to expand on what I was given), so I needed to look into some of it.


  • Plotist Team: Keepers of Code

    This is a tough question for me, I think I get inspired by everyone. Sometimes is people I would like to be like, sometimes is people I would like not to be like.

    Lately, I've been saying that I would like to write like Ursula K. Leguin, build worlds like George RR Martin, and master pace and structure as James SA Corey. Notable mentions are William Gibson's settings, not the worldbuilding but how he brings these worlds to life, Terry Pratchett's humour, Catherynne M Valente's lyricism and Neil Gaiman's whimsical imagination.

    In music there are way too many. As a musician I love many different genres for their own reasons, punk for its raw energy and jazz for its complexity and nuance, and I try to learn techniques and patterns from many sources. But if I have to give a list of favorites, I think my top 2 bands would be Foo Fighters and Pearl Jam.



  • @Rose

    I need to get back into reading older works in general. They have something about them that more modern works are missing in terms of pacing and theme exploration.

    This they do. Especially in pacing-- it was much more acceptable to take two pages to describe a scene or spend a couple of chapters building up to the inciting incident.

    I don't necessarily think that this or theme exploration are missing in modern works; you just have to dig a little harder to find them because of how easy it is to get a story out and into the world anymore.

    @Blackbird said in Who Inspires You?:

    @typical_demigod, @Rose Have you guys ever been to "I Write Like"?

    I actually think I've been there before, but I don't remember what I got. I copy/pasted some scenes that I've crafted out of boredom in relation to Earthlings the past few days and I kept getting Agatha Christie Which is really funny, because I've never read anything by her.

    I believe they adapted it to modern audiences. All well and good, but I'd rather read the original first.

    It's such a delicate balance to bring the original setting into something accessible for modern audiences, though. (I haven't read any Holmes stories though, so I can't say how well the shows/movies do that imo.)



  • *This they do. Especially in pacing-- it was much more acceptable to take two pages to describe a scene or spend a couple of chapters building up to the inciting incident.

    I don't necessarily think that this or theme exploration are missing in modern works; you just have to dig a little harder to find them because of how easy it is to get a story out and into the world anymore.*

    The first probably has something to do with the fact that they were written before there were things like TV or radio, certainly Internet. While books remain a form of entertainment now, that seems to be more true back before other forms of keeping oneself amused developed and became mainstream. To me, there's nothing inherently wrong with it being easier to get a story out into a wider audience than there used to be, it's just a matter of making sure the story itself is decent before (general) you try to put it out there. Or, at least be open to correction if you do and people make suggestions for improvement. It does seem (again, speaking only for myself) that yes, there are certain things missing or truncated in modern works compared to older ones.

    I do wonder how a modern audience would react if they made a TV program with the historical Holmes ascetic in place. I'm sure it would be a turnoff to some people who are looking for something more modern, but it could be interesting depending on how they do it.



  • @Rose said in Who Inspires You?:

    The first probably has something to do with the fact that they were written before there were things like TV or radio, certainly Internet. While books remain a form of entertainment now, that seems to be more true back before other forms of keeping oneself amused developed and became mainstream.

    This is true. Good point.

    There's definitely nothing wrong with how much easier it is to get a story out to a wider audience, but yes, you do have to make sure that the story itself is decent before you put it out there, and not everyone feels the need to do that (for whatever reason). The problem comes with being open to correction. There's a fine line between a person feeling like they're being constructively criticized and being downright berated, and with the difficulty of translating tone in writing, it (seems to?) makes people less willing to listen to criticism.

    Tbh I would love watching something that kept the historical Holmes aesthetic in place, just because I like seeing stuff that represents real period views rather than something twisted so that it will at least partially fit modern views (because when was the last time you read a period book in which the protags didn't magically have modern worldviews?), but I agree, it would probably be a turnoff to some people. But then again, everything is a turnoff to someone.



    • The problem comes with being open to correction. There's a fine line between a person feeling like they're being constructively criticized and being downright berated, and with the difficulty of translating tone in writing, it (seems to?) makes people less willing to listen to criticism.*

    True. Part of it comes down to not what people say, necessarily, but how it's said. When I critique, I try to keep the other person's feelings in mind. How would I feel if someone presented me with what I've just typed to someone else? Would it possibly help and give them something to think about, or would it discourage them from revising something and trying something else? I try what I've seen some people call 'the sandwich method'--give someone something you liked, one thing you think needs improvement under that, and then end with something else you liked. It helps keep the critique balanced.

    (because when was the last time you read a period book in which the protags didn't magically have modern worldviews?)

    I try to spring for older copies of works when I can, so they usually include the original language, thoughts, etc, etc of how the author portrayed it. If I can't do that, it's less likely I'll read it. I'm not too interested in the 'sanitized' copies of things because then you're not actually reading what the author intended. But yes, if they had historical!Holmes on TV, I would at least try the first few episodes. :)



  • There are some older Sherlock Holmes movies, from 1939, that stay pretty true to the source material. I'd look them up if you guys want to watch a more true-to-its-time Sherlock. I"ve watched The Hound of the Baskervilles (one of my favorite Sherlock stories btw) and one other that I can't remember the name right now and they were pretty good.


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