Tip Tuesday Round Up: Bookish inspiration


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    Books can be your best friend when it comes to improving your own writing

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  • Plotist Team: Community Storyteller

    boundaries can, paradoxically, be so helpful to creativity as our brain tries to work around them.”

    Sooo true. I find that if I do not have a box, I can't be creative. In fact every creative person I know needs some type of box to work in. Which is one reason I hate the term "thinking outside the box". lol



  • @Josey said in Tip Tuesday Round Up: Bookish inspiration:

    boundaries can, paradoxically, be so helpful to creativity as our brain tries to work around them.”

    Sooo true. I find that if I do not have a box, I can't be creative. In fact every creative person I know needs some type of box to work in. Which is one reason I hate the term "thinking outside the box". lol

    This is basically the reason I spent the month of December/first week of January working on the rules of my universe. I didn't get anywhere near as much done as I would've preferred, but what I did get done has helped substantially, because now I know where everyone is at any given time, which allowed me to shrink my timeline (which I had been searching for ways to do since I started writing) and keep Nelly involved in the plot (she's been on the chopping block since November, but she's finally found solid ground).


  • Plotist Team: Community Storyteller

    @typical_demigod I love the fact that you have a character chopping block. That and i don't think I could just remove any character from my stories. I think it would break me.


  • Plotist Team: Timeline Master

    @Josey Agreed! Infact I think I'm a bit too reliant on boundaries which is why I've found it so hard to break out of fanfiction into original fiction. When the world and characters are so open I find myself missing all the boxes to work from!

    @typical_demigod I'm impressed with your "chopping block" too - it can be really hard to say goodbye to characters, but I do imagine this makes you a strong editor!!!



  • @Josey @Sian I really hate to say goodbye as well, and I love Nelly, which is why I tried hard to find a place for her, but there was just no where she fit in with her skill sets. :P (Luckily, no one else can be on earth for the last scene due to travel times, so now there's almost no way to cut her from the novel.) Yeah, the other character I had to cut early was my mole, because any way I thought of to include him to the end of Rus's plotline was a plothole D: There are actually several characters that had to be chopped completely from the story that I loved a lot. I'm figuring out still how to tell their story.

    @Sian I can see how that might be a problem. What if you tried to develop your world, characters, etc. in-depth before you started trying to write? I know for some people they always just fall into a hole they can't get out of when they do that instead of figuring it out as they go along, but maybe you're the opposite?


  • Plotist Team: Community Storyteller

    @typical_demigod I think that is where I have difficulty. I would rather have a very long story with lots of characters than cut them. Perhaps the fact that I build characters before story is the potentially a problem. ;)



  • @Josey Yeah... I mean, I have stories with lots of characters, but sometimes it's easier to cut them or find a new way to incorporate them. I'm like you though, I generally know the world and characters before I know anything about the story or plot itself (which is why it's important to eventually find them a place in some story somewhere XD).


  • Plotist Team: Timeline Master

    @typical_demigod yes, thanks for the advice - I think some solid worldbuilding would do me some good before actually starting a story. I might try the "interview" method to flesh out my characters a bit first too...


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